MERSEYSIDE LAND ROVER OWNERS CLUB

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Driving through Sand

However it is wise to engage the centre-locking differential, if you have one, to ensure that the drive is equally distributed to both axles. You should aim to keep the engine revs between 2000 and 3000RPM. This gives you the best chance to maintain enough power to keep moving forward. Be prepared to throttle back quickly if the wheels start to dig in. The faster a wheel is spinning when it does so the deeper it goes and the quicker it does it. Vehicles equipped with traction control have a slight advantage on sand, but remember traction control only works when it senses a wheel slipping, so be careful. If you are venturing out onto beaches and other open areas never go alone. Sand tyres are essential for driving in the dessert, for other areas Mud and all-terrain type tyres work in much the same way as sand tyres do.

we have found all terrain type tyres best suited to sand in the UK, as they do not have such an aggressive tread pattern as MT’s and are less likely to dig into the sand surface.

Sand is similar in many ways to mud in so far as it requires a steady forward momentum to be maintained in order to make progress. Generally you will need to drive at higher speeds through sand than you would need to for mud. Wherever possible examine the route to determine how soft the sand is and also how compacted it is. Soft wet sand will be much harder to negotiate than hard wet sand for example. Dry loose sand will quickly move under your wheels and allow the vehicle to sink if you are not travelling fast enough.

Avoid harsh cornering, braking and acceleration whilst negotiating sandy soils. The use of any of these methods will result in the wheels breaking the surface crust and begin to dig themselves in. If the wheels do start to dig in stop driving immediately, otherwise you’ll be extricating yourself from a very deep hole. Reverse out if you can and find another route or try again with more momentum. When you do become stuck its time to get out the shovel and the sand ladders and start digging. Towing a vehicle stuck in the sand is likely to get the towing vehicle stuck as well, unless that vehicle is on firm ground or has sand waffles to spread the load and keep it’s wheels from breaking the surface crust.

When driving on open areas of sand you should try to maintain the highest safe speed possible. There may be no need to engage low box if you can maintain enough speed and momentum in high range. However it is wise to engage the centre-locking differential, if you have one, to ensure that the drive is equally distributed to both axles. You should aim to keep the engine revs between 2000 and 3000RPM. This gives you the best chance to maintain enough power to keep moving forward. Be prepared to throttle back quickly if the wheels start to dig in. The faster a wheel is spinning when it does so the deeper it goes and the quicker it does it. Vehicles equipped with traction control have a slight advantage on sand, but remember traction control only works when it senses a wheel slipping, so be careful. If you are venturing out onto beaches and other open areas never go alone. Sand tyres are essential for driving in the dessert, for other areas Mud and all-terrain type tyres work in much the same way as sand tyres do

Sand is similar in many ways to mud in so far as it requires a steady forward momentum to be maintained in order to make progress. Generally you will need to drive at higher speeds through sand than you would need to for mud. Wherever possible examine the route to determine how soft the sand is and also how compacted it is. Soft wet sand will be much harder to negotiate than hard wet sand for example. Dry loose sand will quickly move under your wheels and allow the vehicle to sink if you are not travelling fast enough.

Avoid harsh cornering, braking and acceleration whilst negotiating sandy soils. The use of any of these methods will result in the wheels breaking the surface crust and begin to dig themselves in. If the wheels do start to dig in stop driving immediately, otherwise you’ll be extricating yourself from a very deep hole. Reverse out if you can and find another route or try again with more momentum. When you do become stuck its time to get out the shovel and the sand ladders and start digging. Towing a vehicle stuck in the sand is likely to get the towing vehicle stuck as well, unless that vehicle is on firm ground or has sand waffles to spread the load and keep it’s wheels from breaking the surface crust.

When driving on open areas of sand you should try to maintain the highest safe speed possible. There may be no need to engage low box if you can maintain enough speed and momentum in high range.

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